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Phonemic Awareness Details

Strategic Level-Based Development

There are six game levels: Windmill, Mushrooms, Candyland, Monkeys, Treasure Chest, and Wishing Well. Each game has a practice round. The child can repeat the sound of any object by pressing the speaker next to the object. Just touch the correct object to hear if it is correct. The games are intended for preschoolers and older children.

Windmill

This game teaches the child to isolate the first sound in a word. For example, the word “task” take away the T and what is left? “ask”.  Or blast take away the “B” sound and you have “last”. Once in the fourth grade, I was told by my teacher to go look up a word. I responded, “What does it start with?” I was not joking. This game helps the child break out the first sound of a word.

Windmill

Mushrooms

This game breaks the word into individual sounds such as H, A, M and the child picks the picture of the object ham as the voice over says ham. This game helps the child learn how to break up the sounds in the word and put them back together.

Mushrooms

Candyland

This game teaches the child how to change the first sound in a word. For example, D. Dragon says “job” If we change the first sound to “M” what does that make? The child hears “mob” and sees the picture of a group of people.

Candyland

Monkeys

D. Dragon needs help from the monkeys to build his castle. In this game, the child is isolating the first letter of a word and matching the sound. For example, nap the first sound is ‘N’. Match the beginning sound ‘N’ in nap with N in nut. The child pushes down on the picture of a nut as the voice over says “nut”.

Monkeys

Treasure Chest

In this game, the child picks the picture whose sounds make up the object. D. Dragon pronounces each whole word for example “meat” and the child chooses the picture with the individual sounds in meat. Another example is D. Dragon says wrist. One of the three images that appear is a wrist. The voice says R,I,S,T. The child chooses that one, and if not, a voice says “try again” until the child chooses correctly.

Treasure Chest

Wishing Well

One of the hardest things for dyslexic children to do is rhyme. This is a simple rhyming game D. Dragon says “Trap”. The child correctly picks the picture of the map as the voice says map.  The voice then explains that both trap and map end in ap.

Wishing Well